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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 28, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 3pm: ryanair is threatened with legal action for misleading passengers about their rights — as thousands more flights are cancelled. imean, i mean, it's just i mean, it'sjust crazy, isn't it? how can they be so disorganised? it's ridiculous. the eu's lead negotiator says there's a new dynamic to brexit talks, but warns there's still work to be done. we managed to create clarity on some points, on others, however, more work remains to be done and we are not there yet. the england cricketer ben stokes apologises, at least 14 rohingya refugees have capsized. the england cricketer ben stokes apologises, after video emerges, appearing to show him throwing punches in a brawl outside a nightclub.
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also in the next hour, theresa may defends the benefits of a free market economy. in a speech at the bank of england, the prime minister said capitalism's faults had to be addressed — but abandoning the system would be a backward step. and the founder of playboy magazine hugh hefner, has died. he was 91. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. ryanair is being threatened with legal action for "persistently misleading" passengers, about their rights. the move by the uk's air regulator follows the cancellation of thousands more flights, affecting travellers through the christmas period, and well into march next year. the civil aviation authority says it's launched "enforcement action," which is a first step towards a law suit. ryanair‘s problems are due to a shortage of pilots, because of annual leave commitments.
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our business correspondent theo leggett reports. ryanair has already annoyed hundreds of thousands of passengers by cancelling their flights. now the head of the civil aviation authority says he is furious with the airline as well. the company he says has been misleading its customers about their rights. consumers shouldn't have to choose between low—cost fares and their legal rights and that at the moment seems to be what ryanair is saying. you can either have cheap fares or your legal entitlement. under eu law, if yourflight is cancelled your airline is to offer you a seat on another service and if it doesn't have another appropriate service itself, it has to book you with another carrier. it seems ryanair is only offering seats on its own aircraft and for some passengers that isn't appropriate. since the caa made its complaint, we have been contacted by some passengers. matthew rice said for example he had been asking specifically for a seat on another carrier's service. he said over web chat,
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"you are obligated to re—route me..." and the response he got was: "no, iam not." ryanair insists it complies fully with the law and has reminded its customer service agents about passengers' right. it says it is talking to the caa. simon calder thinks that the situation is unprecedented. for the aviation regulator to reprimand ryanair for misleading the public on an industrial scale is simply unheard of, and i think it is going to do a lot of significant damage to the airline. ryanair has cancelled 20,000 flights so far, some 700,000 people have been affected and travellers like these people in edinburgh seem increasingly unimpressed. i feel sorry for the people that use ryanair really, and it is really quite bad for them.
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it will lose a lot of business, that is definite. it isjust crazy, isn't it? how can they be so disorganised? it is ridiculous. they have made a bit of a mess, haven't they? a bit of a catastrophe for them. if ryanair doesn't do what the caa is asking, it could face heavy fines but there is also its reputation to think of. the question now is whether low fares can compensate for any damage done to its brand. our business correspondent theo leggett is here. there is a lot of anger. we have seen it from the c aa and passenger but what are ryanair doing about this? ryanair say but what are ryanair doing about this? rya nair say that but what are ryanair doing about this? ryanair say that they have changed the advice that they have given to call centre workers, telling people to advise customers that people are entitled to another
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flight that people are entitled to another flight ina that people are entitled to another flight in a ryanairflight is not available. working with other budget carriers, and if that is not available, offering the customer another flight but providing that the cost of the ticket does not exceed three times of the ticket cancelled. difficult for ryanair, because with flights this cheap, you are running a tight ship? this is why ryanair has been opposed to the piece of european law. under the circumstance, the compensation bill could be several time whats the passenger has paid for the ticket. but the rules are there, and the c aa says that they must be obeyed. the c aa is angry but what can they do about this? they can ask ryanair to ta ke do about this? they can ask ryanair to take certain step, and if they don't, they can be fored to go to court. and if not, they can be fined
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heavy sums of money. the damage to a company like ryanairline is that the people want low—cost flights and perhaps are prepared to take the risk but ryanair is running that system itself? we have not seen this kind of problem before for ryanair. airlines do have pr gaffes all the time. for example an airline having a passenger removed in what appeared to bea a passenger removed in what appeared to be a violent fashion, problems with baggage, strike, so airlines do have to protect their reputation but what counts is their response to it. ryanair has what counts is their response to it. rya nair has concerns what counts is their response to it. ryanair has concerns over service standards, and it has always gotten away with it, saying it provides the cheapest fares and it is good value for money but it remains to be seen if now offering cheap fares is enough to overcome the reputational damage that this is clearly doing.
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michael 0'leary may be watching us now, what does he need to say to start people perhaps backing ryanair ain? start people perhaps backing ryanair again? he needs to say he is putting the customers first and will abide by the c aa. they have issued a statement, saying that they will abide with the c aa and that they are in talk, but the c aa says that is not happening. it is hard to say where this is going. it is hard to say where this is going. passengers faced delays at airports around the world today following problems with a computer check in system. the passenger management system ‘amadeus' is used by a hundred the passenger management system ‘amadeus' is used by a 125 airlines and long queues at dozens of airports, including gatwick, paris charles de gaulle and melbourne. the computer failure has now been fixed but delays remain for many passengers. amadeus has apologised
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for the inconvenience caused. britain and europe say "decisive steps forward" have been made, in talks over brexit, but much more work still needs to be done. speaking after a fourth round of negotiations in brussels, the eu's michel barnier, and the brexit secretary david davis, agreed there was now more clarity surrounding their discussions, after what was described as a ‘new dynamic,‘ created by theresa may's speech on brexit, in florence last week. however, michel barnier has said it could be months before they move on to talk about a trade deal. both david davis and the eu's main negotiator, michel barnier, describe this, the fourth round of negotiations, as vital. an eu summit‘s just three weeks away and britain had wanted the first phase of the negotiations to be completed by then. that's looking unlikely but mr davis insisted there had now been significant steps forward. when i look across the full ranges of issues to do with our withdrawal from the eu, i'm clear we have made considerable progress on the issues that matter, including certainty, citizens and visitors, providing reassurance to our eu partners in regards to our mutual and financial obligations and agreeing to some of the key principles in relation to issues arising from northern ireland and ireland. last week, theresa may gave a vital speech in florence about brexit. it was more conciliatory,
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it included an offer that britain would pay its dues to the european union, during a two—year transition period, that would follow our official departure in 2019 and her words seem to have had an impact. translation: i think that it is positive that theresa may's speech made it possible to unblock the situation, to some extent, and give a new dynamic to the situation but we're far from being at a stage, and it will take weeks or maybe even months, where we will be able to say, "yes, 0k, there has been sufficient progress on the principles of this orderl withdrawal." the first phase of these brexit talks is all about reaching agreement on three key issues: how much in total britain will pay to leave. the rights of eu citizens living here and british citizens in the other 27 states. and then the complex
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issue of the border between northern ireland and the republic. despite david davis's upbeat assessment, it's clear there are still very sharp differences between the two sides — and the clock is ticking fast towards our departure date of march, 2019. richard galpin, bbc news. let's speak now to maria demertzis — deputy—director of the brussels based economics think—tank, brugel. do you share, well, it was almost relief from david davis there was any sign of the progress in these talks after so long? i certainly share that but i think that theresa may's speech was encouraging in this respect, so i think progress has been made, this is good news. but there is still a long way to go?
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that is true. after what michel barnier said today, that it would ta ke barnier said today, that it would take weeks, possibly months before moving on to the next stage, so that theissues moving on to the next stage, so that the issues that are sticky still are the issues that are sticky still are the divorce bill and the citizens' rights, those of the uk and the eu. more progress has been made on citizens' rights in northern ireland, which is reassuring but the trade issues of how northern ireland is to trade with the rest of ireland remains. so yes, still a lot to discuss. that is a huge issue, the role of the european courts ofjustice is too. without settlement, on the key issue, this is an impasse? this is what has been said. without progress here we cannot move to the next step. judging on the importance of the procedure, they are going stick with it. without seeing sufficient progress on all three issues and the two remaining, we will not move on,
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so we are in for long discussions. are wejust so we are in for long discussions. are we just looking at the eu saying this is what we want and we are waiting to fog you to step up to the mark, that there is not much negotiating a going on?|j mark, that there is not much negotiating a going on? i don't think that is right it depends on the perspective you take. the eu loses out from a bad deal with the uk on any of the points. so if you we re uk on any of the points. so if you were to see it that way, good agreements are a wyn situation, or indeed a lose—lose situation. agreements are a wyn situation, or indeed a lose-lose situation. where you are in brussels is there the interest, is the wrong word but obviously there is an obsession in the uk with how the talks are going but brussels has other things to worry about, where do the eu/uk talks rate in terms of importance? worry about, where do the eu/uk talks rate in terms of importance ?|j think certainly there is a huge acemetery in the rate of interest showns in the uk than in the eu. as you point out, there are so many other things to think about in the
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eu, including the future of the eu architecture but the negotiations with the uk are an important part, if not for anything else, as i said, if not for anything else, as i said, if they are not done properly, a lot could be lost. is there a sense that the uk is becoming the whole issue with brexit, is a nuisance? well, because of the way that the talks have progressing, there is an issue of now, can we pleasejust progressing, there is an issue of now, can we please just get on with it. thank you very much for your time. at least 13 rohingya refugees have drowned after the boats capsized off the coast of bangladesh, eight of them were children. in the past 48 hours, some 2,000 hoe hingea people have arrived crossing boy boat to bangladesh as they flee crackdowns by the army in myanmar‘s state. our
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correspondent is on the border of myanmar. hejoins correspondent is on the border of myanmar. he joins us correspondent is on the border of myanmar. hejoins us now. what are you hearing about the latest deaths as people try to flee by boat? well, the conditions have been really difficult in the last couple of days. a lot of rain and heavy wind about. throughout the day we noticed how rough the seas have been. several boat loads of rohingya refugees have been coming into bangladesh from myanmar it is the preferred route as it is easier to get across than across the land route which takes them through the mountains and jungle where they often could confront hostile burmese military soldiers. but we heard that a boat carrying at least 40 people, maybe more, was approaching the coast of bangladesh when it capsized a little way out into the bay of bengal. many of those on bbc news
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24ed were women and children and all of the victims, nine of them, we understand, are children, the rest are women. that their bodies have been recovered and the authorities here are trying to determine what to do next. we are still waiting to hear if everyone on that boat has been rescued because there is... inaudible. i'm sorry, i think we have a problem on that line. that is sa njoy on that line. that is sanjoy majumder. we will try to connect with him later on. we are getting breaking news on ben stokes. richard conway tweeted: ben stokes and alex ha leshgs s will not be selected for england matches until further notice. each remaining on
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full pay, there is an ongoing police investigation, following the release of very in some #234u7s showing the incidents on monday morning in bristol in which ben stokes was a p pa re ntly bristol in which ben stokes was apparently involved in a fracas in the streets of bristol in the early hours after he had been playing for england. so ben stokes and alex hales not to be considered for selection for england international matches until further notice. more on that a little later on. this is bbc news. 0ur is bbc news. our main stories: the eu's lead negotiator say there is is a new dynamic to brexit talks but there is still work to be done. ryanair and thousands more flights are cancelled. at least 14 rohingya muslim refugees, including eight children are reported drowned after a boat
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carrying them capsized off the coast of bangladesh. in sport, ben stokes and alex hales are not to be considered for selection as investigations continue into the incident in the early hours of monday morning in bristol. a video emerged of ben stokes appearing to be involved in a brawl outside a nightclub. no charges have been brought but the police investigation continues. alex hales was with ben stokes that evening. and the england and world cup qualifiers, fabian delph has been included. and the british bobsleigh chief executive, richard parkes has stood down. the restructuring and extra resources mea ns down. the restructuring and extra resources means a women's team will be partially funded for the winter 0lympics next february. a full update on the stories in the next 15
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minutes. theresa may, has responded to the labour leaderjeremy corbyn's claim that capitalism is facing a crisis of legitimacy, by setting out the benefits of a free market economy. in a speech marking 20 years since the bank of england was given the right to set interest rates, the prime minister said capitalism's faults had to be addressed., but that simply abandoning the system, would be a backward step. 0ur political correspondent chris mason has more. it is nicknamed the old lady of threadneedle street, the bank of england foundered over 300 years ago. england founded over 300 years ago. this is where 40 years ago theresa may started her career. she returned here this morning with a big picture message about her instincts on managing the economy. a free—market economy is the greatest agent of collective human progress ever created. it was the new combination which led societies out of darkness and stagnation and into the light of the modern age. what a contrast with yesterday,
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after the singing at the labour party conference are pitched to run the economy radically differently. party conference a pitch to run the economy radically differently. the capitalist system faces a crisis of legitimacy stemming from the crash. now is the time that government took a more active role in restructuring our economy. now is the time that we developed a new model of economic management to replace the failed dogma of neoliberalism. lets unpick what the party leaders are getting at, the question is how much should the government be involved in running our economy, should ministers control the rent we pay weston or the company that provides our water? the gap between labour and the conservatives on these big questions has not been this wide ina generation. people used to grumble that politicians all sounded the same, you don't hear that much now.
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this is the city of london, the beating heart of the economy or illustrative of its worst excesses depending on your view. the prime minister claims hers is a balanced approach, encouraging businesses to flourish, recognising some feel left behind. but the very fact she is making this argument now shows labour's ability to make the political weather and her need to respond. my argument has always been that if you want to preserve and improve a system which has delivered unparalleled benefits you have to take seriously its faults and do all you can to address them. not to do so would put everything we have achieved together as a country at risk. it would lead to a wider loss of faith in free markets and risk a return to the failed ideologies of the past. and expect theresa may to make this same case at the conservative conference starting this weekend. now more on the breaking news about
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ben stokes. i now bring you richard conway. what has happened ? i now bring you richard conway. what has happened? the ecb have said that ben stokes and alex hales, involved in an incident on the early hours of monday morning in bristol, they have been suspended from consideration for england selection until further notice. they remain on full pay. the ecb say this is pending their investigation and the police investigation, which of course, is john going. so ben stokes, arrested on suspicion of bodily harm. he was released without charge but under investigation still. so, and of course, the video which appears to show ben stokes in the streets. we have not been able to independently verify this. it has been released by
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the sun newspaper today. that appears to have prompted minds and action from the ecb today. the ecb, which is in a very difficult position on this? it is. the investigation isjohn going, the police investigation is on—going but the video appears to show ben stokes in the streets, and in an altercation with unknown members of the public, it has placed them into the public, it has placed them into the position where they have had to start a disciplinary procedure. this morning they were thinking about interim measures, this appears to be it and interim measures, this appears to be itand a interim measures, this appears to be it and a formal procedure ongoing but very much pegged, you think, to what the police decide to do in the case. and in the back of the contradict fan, the ashes? it takes off in a few week's time. ben stokes is a crucial member. a wicket taker, a run scorer there. is criticism and concern about the strength of the england ashes squad. the selector, andrew strauss, the director of
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cricket will want ben stokes on the plane. but will have to be seen to be making the right decisions in light of the circumstances. so they have given breathing space for the police to conclude their enquiries and before the plane leaves to have clarity about whether or not ben stokes clarity about whether or not ben sto kes ca n clarity about whether or not ben stokes canjoin clarity about whether or not ben stokes can join them clarity about whether or not ben stokes canjoin them in clarity about whether or not ben stokes can join them in australia. so at the moment everything is waiting for the results of that police inquiry. it may not take so long? this is it. avon and somerset police are asking for witnesses to come forward. for anyone around the area to make themselves known to provide information. that gives a sense that this will not be settled within the coming hours or day. so a little uncertainty going forward. but the ecb giving themselves time to see what happens before they make a final decision on ben stokes. richard, thank you. the founder of playboy magazine, hugh hefner, has died.
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he was 91. at its peak playboy sold seven million copies a month, and hugh hefner described himself as a pioneer of sexual liberation. 0ur los angeles correspondentjames cook looks back at his life. mr hefner, i suppose you're the world's most famous hedonist. certainly in a very public way. are you a happy man? oh, yes. hugh hefner was the teenage boy who never grew up. a pioneer of 60s sexual liberation. bunny girls, nightclubs, a corporatejet called big bunny, all made possible by the magazine he started at his kitchen table. with marilyn monroe as its first nude centrefold, playboy was an instant hit. in its heyday it sold 7 million copies a month. what i fought for was personal, individual freedom. it is the unpopular views and values, these are the things which need protecting. and i have been vigorous in fighting for that from the very beginning. i think that i take the greatest pride in, it's been almost 50 years now, and i take the greatest pride in the impact that i think
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i personally and playboy has had on changing socio—sexual values of our time. he was attacked by both conservatives and feminists who accused him of reducing women to sexual toys. he claimed to have been a feminist before there was even such a thing as feminism. which is, i mean, hilarious in some ways but he really did set about trying to co—opt feminism into a movement that suited him and suited men in general. when sales dwindled hugh hefner retired to his mansion where the partying continued. at the age of 86, he married his third wife, crystal harris, a playboy playmate 60 years hisjunior. but he was not, he insisted, a dirty old man. i have dealt over the years with racism, with sexism. now it's ageism. i think that age disparity is something, more dramatic age disparity is something which is new because, you know a few years ago
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we were just living to be 50, 60 years old. we have to accommodate and rethink some of our prejudices and perceptions. he died at the playboy mansion in la, surrounded by friends, the self—styled godfather of the sexual revolution. hugh hefner who has died aged 91. you're watching bbc news, a change of gear... you're watching bbc news, a change of gear... a court in germany is due to rule in the case of a mclaren sports car driver who's trying to get the owner of a donkey to pay compensation after the animal is alleged to have chewed the vehicle's paintwork. listen to this: police believe the donkey may have mistaken the bright orange the court will now decide what
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happens. the angry owner wants the donkey owner to pay up. no figures have been mentioned but a pony is on the cards! sorry! let's get a weather update. 0n the other side of the the nooseroom, laughing at that joke, phil avery. good afternoon. still bright in the centre of london. we are done well widely over the british isles with the northern isles the exception. there the sunshine lost rapidly, as indeedin there the sunshine lost rapidly, as indeed in northern ireland. the weather front is coming up. you will see it first up overnight. it will be extensive over the west. the breeze and cloud around. interest
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there is the weather front. not a nice start to the day on friday. save towards the west. brighter skies behind the weather front. a lot of surface water and spray. tricky driving conditions and hill fog. improving from west to east but after the lull in proceedings, a peppering of showers. the top temperature about 18 or 19 celsius. the weekend starts well enough. then the rain begins to appear. across the rain begins to appear. across the western parts. i will will be back with more on that. but make the most of the bright start, it will not last for all of us. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: ryanair has been threatened with legal action from the civil aviation authority for "persistently misleading"
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passengers about their rights after they announced further flight cancellations yesterday. the eu's top brexit negotiator, michel barnier, says there's still much to do, but progress has been made during the latest round of talks with david davis in brussels. we managed to create clarity on some points. 0n others, however, more work remains to be done. and we are not there yet. i believe that thanks to the constructive and determined manner in which both sides have conducted the negotiation we are making decisive steps forward. at least fourteen rohingya muslim refugees are reported to have drowned after a boat carrying them capsized off the coast of bangladesh. ben stokes will not be in the england squad for the ashes tour.
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and in a speech at the bank of england theresa may has defended the benefits of a free market economy saying capitalism's faults need to be addressed, but abandoning the system would be a backward step. we go to the sport. we go to 0lly foster. have i stolen your thunder? are you starting with ben stokes? you always steal my thunder, simon. ben stokes and alex hales have been effectively suspended by england as investigations continue into a brawl outside a bristol nightclub earlier this week. stokes was arrested under suspicion of causing actual bodily harm. no charges have been brought yet, but a video has been released in the last 24 hours by the sun who have acquired it. it appears to show the fight involving the all—rounder. we haven't independently verified the video and just to warn
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you before we show it, it is graphic. it seems to show stokes repeatedly throwing punches towards two men. we know that one man needed to go to hospital for treatment with facial injuries. stokes also suffered a minor fracture in his hand on the night of the incident. stokes was named in the ashes squad yesterday and he has retained the vice—captaincy. he has apologised to the ecb and is said to be devastated. joe, you feel with this story things have accelerated today, but everybody, you, i, the ecb at lords just in limbo as we wait to see if charges will actually be brought? yes. 0lly, the first thing to say is the ecb confirmed that the decision to suspend hales and stokes is based on the video after they viewed that video. the ecb have said as well that they will allow and respect the criminal proceedings to unfold and ta ke criminal proceedings to unfold and take place. again i think that would
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be typical, whenever you have a sports person involved in disciplinary misconduct and police investigations then police activity will take precedence, but there are the sports governing bodies rules and regulations. i looked at the ecb's code of conduct. the ecb is committed to maintaining the highest standards and conduct. put that in connection with the video which allegedly shows ben stokes outside the bristol nightclub. next point, of course, 24 hours ago, stokes named in the ashes squad. so can he possibly in the light of all this go to australia? here is what former england captain michael vaughan thinks? well, for stokes it would be devastating. he stated what he did was wrong. he knows he is in the
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wrong. it is important to the team. stokes offers expertise with the bat and the ball and the field. i don't give england any chance in australia without ben stokes. that's the cricketing value that everybody knows. there is the ethical image if england did go to australia with stokes. that has to be an issue and there is the practicality. you know what it is like and the scrutiny that all england players will get. stokes joe wilson,
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stokesjoe wilson, our correspondent at lord's. we will be back withjoe. it is an international break in football. the final round of world cup qualifiers. england named their squad for the matches against love is evena and lithuania. awin is evena and lithuania. a win could guarantee their place. fabian delph features in a gareth southgate squad. he has nine caps. welbeck, tom heaton are out injured andjamie vardy welbeck, tom heaton are out injured and jamie vardy is managing a hip injury. southgate says that there have been issues. there have been chances that have been limited. but he has dug in and forced his way on to the side and played well. he obviously has not had as many games as we would like. but yes a situation in mid—field where we need more competition for
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places and more alternatives. we think he is a player that can provide that. the wales squad have been announced. hugh will look after you from the next hour and beyond. that's my lot. a good tie. it is one of your old ones i think. it is a bit like thejokes of your old ones i think. it is a bit like the jokes you use! "decisive steps forward" have been made in the latest round of uk—eu talks, the brexit secretary david davis has said. he was speaking at the end of the first talks since theresa may's speech in italy last week in which she said the uk wanted a two—year transition period. michel barnier said the talks were positive, but warned there were still differences on a number of issues. the labour mp hilary benn is chair of the commons brexit select committee, he says not enough has been done to break the "log jam". there is no doubt that the atmosphere was improved as we have heard by the speech the prime
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minister gave in florence, but it hasn't broken the log jam and for me that's the most important thing. indeed, for the future of the whole negotiations because michel barnier in his comments today made it very clear that he doesn't think sufficient progress has been made and unless and until the negotiators are able to get on to part two of the talks which is the future relationship, as chris morrissey was saying, you are not going to be able to sort out the problem of northern ireland because how are you going to end up with a deal that's different between dublin and belfast as opposed to dover and calais and crucially on the question of transitional arrangements, businesses are not going to know for certain, first of all that they are going to happen, and secondly, what they will consist of because what they will consist of because what the prime minister did last week was finally very be laidedly and a lot of time has been lost because of the election, because the government has been frankly arguing amongst itself
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about what position it wants to adopt in the talks, all she has done is to say we would like now to ask formally for transitional arrangements, the european union has got to respond, but the businesses who have been pressing the treasury and other ministers about the importance of those transitional arrangements are saying look, if we don't know quickly what they will consist of and know for sure that they are going to happen then we are going to have to take some decision to protect our businesses against the worst possible outcome which would be no deal. time is of the essence and we all know the clock goes on ticking. and that word, "negotiation" looking at what's going on at the moment. there are those who feel the only side that's compromising is the uk. that the eu has its position and is just waiting for the uk to come round to their point of view? well, i think round to their point of view? well, ithink in round to their point of view? well, i think in truth that reflects the
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situation itself. the uk is the one that has decided to leave and the eu negotiators, michel barnier, the european council have made it very clear, well it is for you to propose how you suggest we might deal with this. what kind of future relationship you want. i think one of the difficulties has been a lack of the difficulties has been a lack of clarity on the part of the uk government about what it was seeking and that has led the european negotiators to say we are not clear about what you are looking for and time frankly has been wasted in the process which is of the upmost urgency. it is a political negotiation and i can understand why the british government is saying a final decision on the money, we'd like to keep until we know what you're prepared to offer on the hugely important question of trade and market access and all of the other questions that remain in people's minds from the practical
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ones, will our european driving licences be recognised after we leave, what happens to health treatment if we get ill in france or germany, all the questions are going to have to be sorted and the reason why transitional arrangements were so important and why the select committee i chair which says you will need them because it buys us time and at the moment what we are running out of is time and that's why the log jam has to be broken to get on to part two of the negotiation and i hope we can do as quickly as possible and i hope that the eu negotiators will on their sideshow sufficient flexibility to say ok, fairenough, sideshow sufficient flexibility to say ok, fair enough, we can't solve all of these divorce questions, without also now turning our attention to what the future relationship will be. we are not there at the moment. you have got money issue which you have talked about. this other issue of the european court of justice about. this other issue of the european court ofjustice and its role, the eu isn't going to budge on
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this, is it? i don't know because look, if there is sufficient flexibility and will, you can come up flexibility and will, you can come up with a solution. 0ne flexibility and will, you can come up with a solution. one thing the british government could do for example is to say as a sovereign country, once we have left, is we will take full account of or give due weight to or advice courts that they should take on board decisions of the european court ofjustice that have relevance to the rights of eu citizens in the future. the alternative approach which we're going to have to have for a lot of these questions, because in any agreement once you have negotiated it, there will be questions of interpretation and implementation and people will say, "i didn't think it meant that." i think we're going to have to establish some kind of hybrid court which would involve the european court of justice hybrid court which would involve the european court ofjustice and our own supreme court, to which all of these matters would be referred. it was a step forward that the
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government announced that it intended that the rights would be enshrined in the legal agreement which would then be implemented in our courts. and in the end, i think, it's a philosophical difference rather than a practical one and for heaven's sake if we can't sort out the question of the 1.2 million brits in the 27 member states and the three million europeans who are living working and paying tax here, then that doesn't bode terribly well for the rest of this very complex negotiation. hilary benn talking to me earlier. the children's charity, unicef uk, says young orphaned refugees with relatives in britain, should to be allowed to live here with their families. it says this would make them less likely to set off on dangerous journeys to other parts of europe, and help cut the risk of exploitation by criminal gangs. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly reports. the perilous route to europe for thousands of refugees. amongst them, children travelling on their own, hoping to eventually reach relatives in the uk. as an ambassador for the children's charity unicef uk, the actor
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michael sheen has met many families from syria displaced by the war there. the charity is campaigning for unaccompanied under—18s with family in britain to be able to come here directly. at the moment, you can't apply to be reunited with your grandparents, or older siblings, or aunts and uncles, unless you are already in europe. so what that's doing is it's making young, unaccompanied children have to take that incredibly dangerous journey to get to europe, just to have a chance to be with the only family they have. 0mar, a syrian refugee whose identity we are protecting, is getting messages from his teenage brother, still trapped in their home country. that's a message from your brother, what's he saying to you? he's saying now i am in aleppo and i am trying to get hold of my certificate because i want to travel, i want to get out of syria. he wants to bring his brother
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here directly, and fears for the teenager's future if he stays in syria. he faces the risk of being recruited and drafted, you know, by different factions. the government forces, the affiliated militias to the government forces. isis. different factions. so everyone is trying to recruit these young people. the home office says its approach is to resettle whole families directly from conflict regions, and that unaccompanied children may be eligible to come to the uk under the vulnerable children's resettlement scheme. residents of the indonesian island of bali are preparing for news on whether and when its most sacred volcano will erupt as indonesia's government has sent out a message to the world that bali is still open for tourists. tens of thousands of people living near the slopes of mount agung
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volcano have been moved from their homes. an exclusion zone of seven miles around the mountain has been set up. hywel griffith sent this update from bali. life on bali's tourist beaches is continuing more or less as normal and that's exactly what the indonesian government is hoping for. it sent out a letter addressed to the people of the world, talking about the fact that bali is still open for business and even if there is an eruption they have contingency plans in place to send aircraft in different directions and have ferries which could take people off the island. some people we've been speaking to at a bar say they wouldn't mind being marooned on bali for an extra couple of days. a different situation however for the 80,000 or more people who have been evacuated from their homes, taken out of the red zone, which surrounds mount agung. many of those coming to the end of the first week as evacuees. some have got a couple of bags full of clothes to keep them going. however, one centre we visited this
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morning, it became obvious that the women and children were there but some of the men were going back into the risky zone to tend to the animals. in some cases i guess their main sales of income. so there's a bit of tension here in bali over how this is going to play out. the question really everyone wants answered is if and when an eruption will come. there's no answer to that, although the earthquakes continue coming, the seismic activity is still very, very frequent. an eruption could be minutes or hours, days, maybe even months away. hywel griffith on the beach in bali. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc news: the england cricketer — ben stokes — has been suspended from international cricket — after a video emerges, appearing to show him throwing punches in a brawl outside a nightclub.
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the eu's lead negotiator says there's a new dynamic to brexit talks, but warns there's still work to be done. ryanair is threatened with legal action for misleading passengers about their rights — as thousands more flights are cancelled. with 18 months to go until the uk officially leaves the eu bbc news is looking at the central aspects of brexit over the coming months starting with travel and trade. let's go live to our business presenter susannah streeter who's at the london gateway for us. hello. well, at this huge port on london's thames estuary, there are around 20 megaships that arrive here every single weekment many of them carrying many more than 9,000 containers. you can imagine trying to keep track of the goods is no mean feat. they use a community sharing information system which is like a really advanced tracking system to make sure that everybody
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involved in clearing and transporting goods through this port shares information. now the customs border between sweden and norway is thought to be among the most technologically advanced in the world. norway which isn't a eu member, of course has the longest eu border with sweden which is a european union member and apparently trade is flourishing and norway says it's frictionless. so what can the uk learn from this relationship? well, the bbc‘s rory cellan—jones has been finding out. iam head i am head of section here at the border between norway and sweden. we are the biggest border crossing
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point in norway. we are looking for persons that smuggle. 0r bringing contraband persons that smuggle. 0r bringing contra band into persons that smuggle. 0r bringing contraband into norway. we have a big scanner. it's a big x—ray and it inspects the lorries. so we don't have to unload every lorry. we work together. my officers work 50% for sweden and eu and 50% for norway. the ambition is that a large proportion of the lorries passing here, should pass without human contact really. with a hard
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border, they have a big issue because then you have to establish a new facilities and you have to recruit a lot of people to deal with it. make a deal. really. the operators cranes which are the tallest in the world are busy unloading the 9,000 containers which have arrived. 0nce unloading the 9,000 containers which have arrived. once they have been unload they will be transported by road and rail. how will brexit affect the truckers and the lorry drivers which are involved in this huge transportation feat? duncan buchanan can tell us. he is the chief policy adviser from the road haulage association. hello duncan. let's talk about that. what impact could this have on the road haulage industry if there isn't a frictionless deal post brexit? well,
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for a port like this one which is a container port, the impact is not going to be very significant at all other than issues around labour and recruiting of drivers and so on. the issue for us is really what happens at the ports where row row ferries come in with loads of trucks that just at the moment drive off those vessels and straight into the final destinations in the supply chain. that is a complete change is going to be required to put in place customs processes to make that as speedy and fluid as it possibly can. the concept of frictionless needs to be taken out of people's heads. customs controls are going to be introduced. the government has said so. we're coming out of the single internal market. so customs controls will be required and that is going to require quite a huge adjustment for those companies that are trading
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with the eu at the moment. so we heard there and we saw the example of norway which, of course, is in the single market. so you think, it is very difficult for lessons to be learnt, isn't it, if you are not going to have the same model? we have been told we're not having that model. we may have a dimp model where we will be able to do things in advance of lorries boarding the vessel in calais or boarding the vessels in ireland and coming over to holyhead. those sorts of processes need to be sorted out. at the moment, business does not have any knowledge on what those processes will be and so they need time to be able to deal with whatever customs come up with, that they need to comply with. duncan bude canyon, thank you very much. i know the association really does have big questions around really recruitment of drivers and those hauliers because there is a recruitment shortage going on and what will happen post brexit once
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immigration controls are introduced? that's a key issue, but this port says it will be able to cope with more trade coming through here, if it is eu goods and tracking all the goods, but other ports will find it a lot more difficult. back to you. suzanna, thank you very much. amazon's echo has been the surprise hit gadget of the past couple of years. the device you can talk is a best seller in a competitive new market of voice assistants. 0ur north america technology reporter dave lee went to the company's seattle headquarters to find out what's coming next. foran aur for an aur amazon rolled off a number of devices. it including echo assistant and some new buttons to use with the echo. a small version ofa use with the echo. a small version of a screen called the echo spot and an updated smart tv ad vice. this is the new amazon echo, it will cost £99 of the it is shorter than the
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previous model and amazon says it has better sound as well. it comes ina has better sound as well. it comes in a variety of different shells, designed to make it fit into the decor in your home. there is the upgraded echo plus which has smart home capabilities so i can walk into my kitchen in the morning and say alexia, good morning. it will give mea alexia, good morning. it will give me a travel update, a weather update and turn on the lights and it will put the kettle on as well! there are a lot of new options now. do you think normal people might find them too confusing? one of the confusions will be between the echo which is the new echo which is a smaller device. it looks cute and the echo plus which is the same thing, but makes smart home connectivity easier, there will be a lot of people saying i'm not sure which one i need and if you create that void ifi i need and if you create that void if i don't know what i need they panic and walk away and buy something different. the selection
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upfront doesn't confuse the simplicity and what's most important is once you have installed the product, it's incredibly simple and nothing changed about that. it is super, simple and approachable and she is able to do all, she has been able to do and more. amazon has clearly been working very hard to increase the lead it has in home assistants, but all eyes orren google. we are expecting a new home device from them as early as next week. if you have got one of those devices, ask it for the news headlines. you might recognise the voice! you now the weather. phil avery. much to tell you, little time. let's crack ovenlt i'm going to show you what is happening with these two storms. much chat about those heading our way. in fact, storms. much chat about those heading ourway. infact, i'm storms. much chat about those heading our way. in fact, i'm look at that lump of cloud. if it turns wet and windy with you on sunday, it
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is more likely what that mass of cloud is there, rather the two systems i was showing you earlier. before that, i've got that all that area of low pressure to throw its way towards us. the cloud is gathering in the far west of cornwall and it's also doing much the same in northern ireland where the same in northern ireland where the rain is pushing into the west. it will turn wet and windy overnight. and the cloud fills in ahead of that, there will be the odd bit and piece of rain moving in ahead of the weather front and the win is there to be had across the northern isles of scotland. how are we doing on friday? not very well. northern and eastern parts of scotland, a lot of surface water and spray. the first signs of something brighter moving out of northern ireland and getting into the western side of scotland, the rain there to be had through the eastern side of wales, through the north—west of england. around about the greater manchester area and liverpool, awash and coming down to the m5, m4, down towards the south—west, but already you see even at this stage there are
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brighter skies moving in around about the irish sea fringes and slowly, oh so slowly, we will push that prospect in towards edinburgh and towards the midlands. it will be before the afternoon before we will see that. it will take an age to get the cloud and rain from the east anglia area. let's talk about the weekend quickly. saturday, starts off fine enough, but the cloud and rain fills off fine enough, but the cloud and rainfills in off fine enough, but the cloud and rain fills in quickly across the western areas. some of that really heavy. this is the first signs of that mass of cloud i was pointing at up that mass of cloud i was pointing at up on the eastern side of canada. it gradually works its way across the atla ntic gradually works its way across the atlantic between now and then. notice the number of isobars. that big area of low pressure is the mass of cloud from canada. the storms, such as they are by this stage, are these little kinks here. that's the first one. that's lee. lurking behind me is the remnants of maria. if you hear about two hurricanes on the way, that's not really the big
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issue. there are bits and pieces of rain and strengthening of the win, but my real concern about sunday and monday, isjust but my real concern about sunday and monday, is just about the intensity of the rainfall and the strength of the wind as well. loads going on. more at the bbc weather website. this is bbc news, the headlines at 4pm. the england cricketer ben stokes is suspended from international cricket after a video emerges appearing to show him throwing punches in a brawl outside a nightclub. ryanair is threatened with legal action for misleading passengers about their rights — as thousands more flights are cancelled. the eu's lead negotiator says there's a new dynamic to brexit talks but warns there's still work to be done. we managed to create clarity on some points. 0n others, however, more work remains to be done, and we are not there yet. at least 14 rohingya muslim refugees are reported drowned,
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when a boat carrying them capsized off the coast of bangladesh. also in the next hour, theresa may defends the benefits of a free—market economy. in a speech at the bank of england, the prime minister said capitalism's
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